Toward Brain-Machine Interfaces for the Treatment of Neurological Injuries and Diseases: Predictive Multiscale Computational Electromagnetic Modeling for Bioelectric Activity and Neuroimplant Design (Prof. Gianluca Lazzi)

 

  Novel Out-of-the-Box Antenna Designs for the Next Generation CubeSats: from Concepts to Missions (Prof. Yahya Rahmat-Samii)

 

 

Toward Brain-Machine Interfaces for the Treatment of Neurological Injuries and Diseases: Predictive Multiscale Computational Electromagnetic Modeling for Bioelectric Activity and Neuroimplant Design

Prof. Gianluca Lazzi,  Provost Professor of Ophthalmology, Electrical Engineering, Clinical Entrepreneurship, and Biomedical Engineering, Fred H. Cole Professor of Engineering Director, Institute for Technology and Medical Systems (ITEMS) University of Southern California

 

Abstract

Although technical challenges are still daunting, the clinical utility of neuroprosthetics has increased dramatically over the past few years. This has been accomplished through the convergence of numerous disciplines, which have individually added fundamental understanding/capabilities to systems that interface with the human body to restore senses and movement, or treat prevalent diseases that have currently no foreseeable cure. Among these, predictive multiscale computational modeling methods have greatly aided in the design of neuroprosthetics by embracing the complexity of the nervous system, which span multiple spatial scales, temporal scales, and disciplines. In this talk, we will cover some of the recent advances in neuroprosthetics, with a focus on systems such as an artificial retina to restore vision to the blind and a hippocampus prosthetic system for memory restoration. The role of computational electromagnetics in the design of these systems will be covered. Further, multiscale computational electromagnetic methods employed to elucidate mechanisms of action behind newly proposed therapeutic treatments for incurable eye diseases and other degenerative conditions will be discussed.

Biography

 

      Gianluca Lazzi, PhD MBA is a Provost Professor of Ophthalmology, Electrical Engineering, Clinical Entrepreneurship and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) where he is also the holder of the Fred H. Cole Professorship and the Director of the newly established Institute for Technology and Medical Systems (ITEMS), a newly established joint initiative of the Keck School of Medicine and the Viterbi School of Engineering. He has authored or coauthored more than 250 international journal papers, conference presentations, and book chapters on implantable devices, neuroengineering, medical applications of electromagnetics, wireless telemetry, antenna design, computational modeling, dosimetry, and bioelectromagnetics. Dr. Lazzi currently serves as the Chair of the Fellow Committee of the IEEE EMBS, a member of the Editorial Board of IEEE Access, and a Guest Editor of the Special Issue on “Wireless Real-time Health Monitoring Technology for Personalized Medicine,” recently published in the IEEE Transactions in Antennas and Propagation (2019). He served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters from 2008 to 2013; Guest Editor for the Special Issue on “Biological Effects and Medical Applications of RF/Microwaves” of the IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques in 2004; Technical Program Chair of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation International Symposium and URSI meeting in Charleston, SC, USA, in 2009; Member of the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the IEEE; Chair of the IEEE Sensors Council Fellow Committee; Chair of the Publications Committee of the IEEE AP Society and VP Publications of the IEEE Sensors Council; and Chair of the USNC-URSI Commission K. In 2014, he was the General Co-Chair of the IEEE Microwave Symposium on RF and Wireless Technologies for Biomedical Applications. Dr. Lazzi is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), and a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). is the recipient of the 1996 Curtis Carl Johnson Memorial Award from the Bioelectromagnetics Society, the 1996 URSI Young Scientist Award, the 2001 Whitaker Foundation Biomedical Engineering Grant for Young Investigators, the 2001 National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the 2003 NCSU Outstanding Teacher Award, the 2003 NCSU Alumni Outstanding Teacher Award, the 2003 ALCOA Foundation Engineering Research Award, the 2006 H.A. Wheeler Award from the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society for the best application paper published in the IEEE Transactions in Antennas and Propagation in 2005, the 2008 Best Paper Award at the IEEE GlobeCom Conference, the 2009 ALCOA Foundation Distinguished Engineering Research Award, the 2009 R&D 100 Award, and the 2009 Editors Choice Award from the R&D Magazine for the Artificial Retina Project. In 2015, he co-founded Teveri LLC, which is focused on the commercialization of liquid metal technology for textile, consumer electronics, and military applications.

  

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Novel Out-of-the-Box Antenna Designs for the Next Generation CubeSats: From Concepts to Missions 

Yahya Rahmat-Samii, is a Distinguished Professor, a holder of the Northrop-Grumman Chair in electromagnetics, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE) and the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, the winner of the 2011 IEEE Electromagnetics Field Award, and the Former Chairman of the Electrical Engineering Department, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)

 

Abstract

Recent interests in utilizing CubeSats for communications, remote sensing and planetary missions have remarkably changed the face of satellite industry. Relying on their small size and low cost has opened the door for missions that seemed impossible with conventional satellites. Among various design components the development of antenna systems that can meet the data-rate and spatial resolution requirements for future space missions has demanded much attention. The tradeoffs between mechanical complexity and RF performance offer amazing opportunities to antenna engineers to seek innovative out-of-the-box and exotic designs. Although most of the earlier missions required low-gain antennas due to their ease of mechanical integration, modern CubeSats require high-gain antennas that can stow in a small volume during launch and deploy reliably in space. Typically the CubeSat bus occupies 1.5U to 12U volume whereby 1U represents a 10x10x10 cm3. It is one of the main objectives of this plenary talk to present and elaborate on the challenges and opportunities that CubeSats will bring about to antenna engineers who seek for new antenna concepts and developments. The antenna concepts highlighted in this talk are both symmetric and offset mesh deployable reflector antennas, 3D-prineted lens antennas, deployable reflectarrays and others to be used in missions for remote sensing, deep space and Internet of Space (IoS). The talk will elaborate on the design, fundamental features, numerical characterizations, prototyping and measurement verifications. As the dream of affordable space missions and global connectivity is becoming a reality, this talk will also address what could be expected in the future and what needs to be realized in the field of antenna engineering addressing the future of ever exciting space missions.

Biography

  Yahya Rahmat-Samii, is a Distinguished Professor, a holder of the Northrop-Grumman Chair in electromagnetics, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE) and the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, the winner of the 2011 IEEE Electromagnetics Field Award, and the Former Chairman of the Electrical Engineering Department, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He was a Senior Research Scientist with the Caltech/NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has authored or coauthored more than 1100 technical journal and conference papers and has co-authored over 35 book chapters and six books. He has more than 20 cover-page IEEE publication articles.

Dr. Rahmat-Samii is a fellow of IEEE, AMTA, ACES, EMA, and URSI. He was a recipient of the Henry Booker Award from URSI, in 1984, which is given triennially to the most outstanding young radio scientist in North America, the Best Application Paper Prize Award (Wheeler Award) of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation in 1992 and 1995, the University of Illinois ECE Distinguished Alumni Award in 1999, the IEEE Third Millennium Medal and the AMTA Distinguished Achievement Award in 2000. In 2001, he received an Honorary Doctorate Causa from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. He received the Technical Excellence Award from JPL in 2002, the 2005 URSI Booker Gold Medal presented at the URSI General Assembly, the 2007 IEEE Chen- To Tai Distinguished Educator Award, the 2009 Distinguished Achievement Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, the 2010 UCLA School of Engineering Lockheed Martin Excellence in Teaching Award, and the 2011 campus-wide UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award. He was also a recipient of the Distinguished Engineering Educator Award from The Engineers Council in 2015, the John Kraus Antenna Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society and the NASA Group Achievement Award in 2016, the ACES Computational Electromagnetics Award and the IEEE Antennas and Propagation S. A. Schelkunoff Best Transactions Prize Paper Award in 2017, and the prestigious Ellis Island Medal of Honor in 2019. The medals are awarded annually to a group of distinguished U.S. citizens who exemplify a life dedicated to community service. These are individuals who preserve and celebrate the history, traditions, and values of their ancestry while exemplifying the values of the American way of life and are dedicated to creating a better world. He has had pioneering research contributions in diverse areas of electromagnetics, antennas, measurement and diagnostics techniques, numerical and asymptotic methods, satellite and personal communications, human/antenna interactions, RFID and implanted antennas in medical applications, frequency-selective surfaces, electromagnetic band-gap structures, applications of the genetic algorithms, and particle swarm optimizations. His original antenna designs are on many NASA/JPL spacecrafts for planetary, remote sensing, and Cubesat missions.

He is the Designer of the IEEE AP-S logo which is displayed on all IEEE AP-S publications. He was the 1995 President of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society and 2009–2011 President of the United States National Committee (USNC) of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). He has also served as an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer presenting lectures internationally.

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